Integrated Family Community Services 3370 South Irving Street, Englewood, CO 80110-1816 Ph: 303-789-0501

Facebook Twitter

5 Safety Concerns All Parents Have & How to Address Them

5safetyconcernallparenthaveChildren seem to have a magnetic draw to dangerous situations; they are curious and can’t comprehend risk or consequences. A hurt or injured child is every parent’s nightmare. We are going to look at some common health concerns and how to protect your child. Kids will be kids but that doesn’t mean we can’t guide our children and avoid health scares along the way.

Busy Streets

It is a beautiful day when you can send your children outside to play without constant supervision. Kids should spend lots of time outside playing and discovering the world. If your house is close to a busy road, it can be unnerving to send your child out to play. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2013, one in every five children under the age of 14 who were killed in traffic crashes were pedestrians. Talking with your children about the danger of going into the street and teaching them the importance of looking both ways before crossing will help your children practice street safety.

Unsupervised Pool Play

Leaving a child unattended in a body of water can result in disaster. Children can drown so quickly and always need to be supervised while in the water. If you have a pool at your home, set up a fence with an alarm so children are never playing close to the pool without your knowledge. Establish rules about when it is appropriate to go swimming and how children, especially those who aren’t experienced swimmers, can’t be in there without adult supervision. Just in case, though, it is a good idea to leave pool noodles and floating devices inside the pool so that a child can have access to them if they disobey and get need help.  I am sure that there are places like The Pool Store where you can easily find equipment like that. Other things that would be good to think about in regards to pull safety are sturdy ladders, tarps, and lighting.

Falling Furniture

Look around your home and your child’s room to assess which pieces of furniture might pose a risk to your children. Your child could be climbing on the bookshelf to reach something and it could tip, or large wall art by their bed could fall during the night. You don’t need to get rid of furniture or décor, just make it safe for the entire family. For example, anchor large bookshelves to the wall, don’t put art or décor by your child’s bed and install a gate on steep stairs in your home.

Burned Skin

Children are so fascinated by light and fire which makes them hugely vulnerable to being burned. Burns can happen quickly and have lasting impacts on their skin. Supervising young children around hot objects that could burn them (stoves, fireplaces, and fireworks) will keep your children safe from burns. Talking about fire safety and showing older children hot items to avoid will keep them safe. To help with this, it would be a good idea to establish rules about how close to the oven or fireplace younger children can get to.

Choking on Food

Choking is one of the most worrisome health concerns in young children, but choking can still occur in older children. With young children, cutting their food up into small pieces and avoiding nuts, grapes and hard candy will prevent choking. With older children it is important to teach them the universal sign for choking so they can ask for help if they are choking. To prevent that from even happening, though, it is important that all children know that anything that isn’t food shouldn’t be swallowed and all food should be chewed thoroughly.

Raising children is difficult and we all just want our kids to be safe and happy. Understanding the risks and safety concerns that you and your child should be aware of can help you avoid these health scares!

Tim Esterdahl

Tim Esterdahl is the editor of IFCS blog. He is a married father of three and enjoys golf in his spare time.

Find Us on Social Media

Facebook

Google Plus

Twitter

Key Sponsors

Our Affliations

 

 

IFCS

Sign Up for our eNewsletter

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter
For Email Marketing you can trust

USDA Non-Discrimination Policy

IFCS follows the USDA non-discrimination policy. Learn more by clicking here to read the statement. (PDF)