Happy and Healthy: 5 Habits of Effective Families

Happy family is preparing a healthy dinner in the kitchen. Mother is cutting vegetables.   [url=http://www.istockphoto.com/search/lightbox/9786778][img]http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/364/familyyv.jpg[/img][/url]

Happy family is preparing a healthy dinner in the kitchen. Mother is cutting vegetables.
[url=http://www.istockphoto.com/search/lightbox/9786778][img]http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/364/familyyv.jpg[/img][/url]

Families that work well don’t just happen—their dynamic is the result of mutual hard work and dedication. This usually involves prioritizing the family over other, less-important things. The following are five great habits that almost all functional families practice.

They Value Quality Time

It takes both time and effort, all day every day, to maintain a close and healthy relationship with another person. If you aren’t putting in the hours, you aren’t going to have a strong relationship. If you want a great family, you have to make time for it. There is no getting around this basic fact.

They Eat Together

You may not be able eat every meal together, but sharing food is one of the most powerful ways for people to bond. Furthermore, eating together tends to naturally foster conversation. If you want a great family, try to make sure everyone gets together for dinner most nights. This will help make sure you are putting in the time and also experiencing significant bonding in a positive way. A homemade sit-down dinner also provides a great opportunity to make and share a healthy meal, encouraging good nutrition and eating habits.

They Put Family First

Good parents will often make an effort to secure enough income to ensure their family’s basic needs are met. But they will also often turn down opportunities to advance their career, if those would undermine the welfare of the family. They will put family ahead of the pursuit of the almighty dollar. They don’t pursue wealth at the expense of the health of the family.

They Don’t Criticize

Achieving excellence in anything means having good rubrics that promote best practices. It also means having some tolerance for mistakes and imperfections. A child welfare specialist with a master of social work degree says this tolerance can help children know they’re in a safe place when they’re at home. Great families understand that condemning one another is simply destructive. It won’t improve anything.

They Exercise

Even if it just involves walking to the park together, they understand the principle of “A sound mind in a sound body.” They know that being healthy as an individual requires a baseline of physical health. They foster that as a group by being active together.

Healthy, happy, effective families know that all-for-one and one-for-all simply works. They know that their strengthened bonds and increased sense of well-being is definitely worth the effort involved.

Tim Esterdahl

Tim Esterdahl is the editor of IFCS blog. He is a married father of three and enjoys golf in his spare time.

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