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How to Keep in Contact With Old Friends and Relatives

People lose contact with old friends and relatives for a variety of reasons. Sometimes one person switches to a method of communication that the other person rarely uses or hates. Sometimes people lose touch because of life events that take up a lot of time or limit communication. You can maintain close ties with friends and relatives. You simply need to follow these four rules:

Reach Out to Them

If you currently aren’t keeping in contact with the important people in your life, it’s time to let them know that you’re interested in staying in touch. Some people wait a long time for an old friend or relative to make the next move because they fail to realize that the other person is waiting for them to do it.

Method of Communication

Whether you have a small or large social circle, you must find a happy middle ground to keep the lines of communication open. If a loved one prefers to communicate via a social network like Facebook and you dislike the platform, ask the person to consider a compromise like phone calls. You don’t need to have a monthly cell phone service. Plenty of phone carriers like www.mintsim.com, offer inexpensive prepaid plans. Using prepaid plans can be a great way to make cell phones service that much easier.

Schedule

Many people stop talking to one another because they never schedule a time to make contact. They just call, write or show up whenever they feel like it hoping that they can reach the other person. This bad behavior often results in at least one person experiencing irritation. Set a date and time to interact when you’re both available and then note it on your calendar so that you don’t forget.

Use Proper Etiquette

If you’re fed up because you feel like you’re putting in lot of effort to stay in contact with one person, reach out and talk about the situation. Explain that you want to stay in touch, but that you can’t be the only person who takes an active role. You might learn from this discussion that the other person is fed up because they feel like you reschedule calls or face-to-face meetups too often. Another possibility is that the other person just hasn’t had enough time in recent weeks or months for personal interactions.

It isn’t difficult to keep in contact with old friends and relatives. You merely need to invest time and effort into communicating with them in clear and efficient ways.

Tim Esterdahl

Tim Esterdahl is the editor of IFCS blog. He is a married father of three and enjoys golf in his spare time.

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