Keeping Kids Safe While they Walk or Ride Bikes to School

It used to be commonplace for children to walk or ride their bikes to school. Nowadays, parents worry more about risks to their children’s safety, and the rite of passage and independence kids used to feel on their way to class is becoming a rarity. Though the worry is completely understandable with the state of the world today, there are a few lessons parents can teach their children that will make everyone feel more confident about staying safe. 

Teach Them Traffic Safety and Bike Handling Skills

When your child is on the roads, they need to understand the very real danger that motorists and other bikers can pose to them. Teach them to stay on bike paths and in bike lanes whenever possible, to follow the proper right of way and all traffic signs. If your child is biking, a helmet should be mandatory and your child should be able to confidently operate their bike without weaving out of their lane. If they do get hurt by a driver, it’s important to seek help from Utah bicycle accident lawyers.

Focus on the Road and Limit Distractions

Most kids are naturally easily distracted and have trouble focusing. The advent of smart phones has only worsened an age old problem, with many kids buried in their phones crossing the street. Try to teach your kids that the way to school can be dangerous if they aren’t paying attention. Making sure to protect themselves from traffic and being attentive to any suspicious people around them is essential. 

Look at the People and Cars They Pass

Teach your children to be vigilant observers of the people around them. It’s not easy to explain that there are people that could hurt them, but it’s good to make your child aware that some people might have harmful intentions. By teaching your child to observe details about suspicious behaviors (such as a car slowing down or following them,) they will learn to leave unsafe situations faster.

No Adult Should Need Their Help

It’s a common tactic of child predators to ask a child for help and lure them into an unsafe situation. Teach your children that no adult should ever need to ask them for their help, period. That’s a red flag and you can tell them to immediately refuse and remove themselves from that situation.

Teaching your child these skills will help equip them to keep themselves and other children around them safe while walking or biking to school, and start a healthy dialogue about dangers that they could face.

 

 

Tim Esterdahl

Tim Esterdahl is the editor of IFCS blog. He is a married father of three and enjoys golf in his spare time.

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