Makes and Models: How to Select the Right Car for Your Family Pocketbook

When you buy a car, you want something that will last for many years to come. You also want something that will be as easy as possible on your budget. Fortunately, there are many ways to get the car that you need without paying too much for it.

Should You Buy or Lease?

If you like to drive newer cars with advanced safety and entertainment features, it may be in your best interest to lease. Lease payments are lower, which makes them easier to afford. When the lease expires, you can simply turn the car in and exchange it for a newer model. However, if you tend to drive a lot or drive over rough terrain, buying a vehicle may make more sense.

Economy Cars Have Plenty to Offer

Even if you only have $15,000 or so to spend on a car, you can still get everything that you want and need. Ford offers subcompact, compact and other economy models that are safe and reliable for yourself and your family. These base model vehicles may come with an entertainment package, air conditioning and everything else that you will need to get the most from your vehicle.

Make Sure to Take a Test Drive

Before you buy a vehicle, make sure that you take a test drive first. This ensures that you know what you are spending thousands of dollars on before you agree to make any payments. Some companies, like Rebel Ford, realize that if a car doesn’t handle well, offer a smooth ride or provide enough legroom while driving, it won’t be something that you’ll enjoy driving for many years to come. If you buy from a private party, make sure to have the vehicle inspected first.

Does the Car Come With a Warranty?

When you buy a vehicle, you may have the option of buying an extended warranty on it. In some cases, you may be able to double the length of an existing warranty for only a few dollars a month. This may be worthwhile for those who may not have a lot to spend on car repairs while they are still making payments on the vehicle.

It is critical that you choose a car that you both like and can afford. In most cases, you will spend the next five years making payments on what is likely to be a depreciating asset. Therefore, you have to make sure that you are getting maximum value for every dollar that you spend.

Tim Esterdahl

Tim Esterdahl is the editor of IFCS blog. He is a married father of three and enjoys golf in his spare time.

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