Safety Smarts: Five Ways You Could Be Endangering Your Family at Home

Your home should be your perfect sanctuary and a place of safety, but you could inadvertently be putting your family in danger. In fact, there are several hidden dangers lurking in every home. Here are just a few of the everyday items in your home that you may want to take a closer look at to protect all you own and your family.
Safety Smarts Five Ways You Could Be Endangering Your Family at Home
Mothballs
If you’re using mothballs to keep critters out of your seasonal clothes, you may want to rethink the method. These balls slowly convert from solid to gas, and the fumes can be dangerous for your family. One of the active ingredients found in many mothballs, paradichlorobenzene, has been linked to cancer in animals.

Lead Paint
If your home was built before 1978, it could have been made with lead paint. As the paint peels, it may be ingested accidentally by children. Another threat is the dust from lead paint that’s sanded. The fine particles can be inhaled by people of all ages. If you find that your home has lead-based paint, it’s best to let the professionals handle the removal.

Check the Plastic
Plastics that are warmed in the microwave can release bisphenol-a, or BPA. This chemical is toxic, and is known as a hormone disruptor. It can lead to neurological problems for children, and that’s particularly frightening when you consider how many plastic baby bottles are warmed in microwaves. Look for BPA-free plastic, and avoid warming any food in plastic containers.

The Garage Door
Garage doors and Calgary overhead doors are fitted with sensors that stop the door from closing on a toy, your car, or a child. If these sensors aren’t working, the results can be tragic. The Garage Door Company Ltd recommends checking sensors occasionally by putting a cardboard box in the door’s path. The door should rise up immediately after hitting the box. If it crushes the item, you should disconnect the opener and immediately call to have it serviced.

Old Windows and Sliding Doors
The problem with an ancient patio door isn’t the low energy efficient ratings, or the fact that it’s a little hard to open. The real problem is that it’s not made with safety glass. Glass from a few decades ago is very easy to break, and can lead to serious injury if a child runs into the door, or extreme temperatures cause a crack. Consider replacing older sliding patio doors, large windows that children can lean against, and storm doors. These fixtures should all have safety glass that won’t shatter and cut someone who falls into them.

There are many hidden dangers around your home. While you know to keep pesticides locked up, and you’re always on the lookout for mold, you may not have given these other hazards a second thought. Protect your home and family by looking more closely for these hidden dangers.

Tim Esterdahl

Tim Esterdahl is the editor of IFCS blog. He is a married father of three and enjoys golf in his spare time.

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