This Easter, Give Back with a Community Brunch

Easter weekend is the perfect occasion to give your expertise and time to your community. According to the National Poverty Center, in 2010 approximately 15% of all people in America were in poverty. These individuals deserve some time to enjoy the world they live in, and you can make it happen by organizing your very own Easter Morning Brunch and Egg Hunt.

The Power of Food

Nothing brings people together like food. Everyone enjoys eating special treats on a holiday, and children especially, enjoy a good scavenger hunt with surprises that follow. To this end, making brunch for the community, especially families in need, can help strengthen the social support system between those in need, and those who can help. To make this event a reality, all you need to do is find a venue interested in supporting your efforts, acquire all the accoutrements that make a meal into a special occasion, and advertise around your whole community to fundraise for the event.

Photo by MDGovpics via Flickr

Finding the Venue

Of course, there are soup kitchens around, but set your event up in an alternative location like a banquet hall, or party house to set the mood as one of celebration. Many local organizations offer affordable rates for renting various rooms and depending on how many people you expect and whether or not the venue has a waitlist, they may negotiate with you since it is for a good cause. Moving this event out of the soup kitchens that people in need are used to frequenting, will set up the air of something special, making your brunch an unforgettable experience. You can check out punchbowl.com to view available spaces in your area and compare prices and availability.

Photo by ppacificvancouver via Flickr
Breathe Life into Your Venue

Once you have a plan for your space, you can really make it come to life by planning for festive decorations, sending the message that this event isn’t only about the wealthy giving to the poor, but about a community gathering together to support each other and feast as one. Since it’s spring, make sure you add flowers to your list, not only as centerpieces but as the glue that brings the room together. Coordinate flowers with tableware, cutlery, tablecloths, and place cards for your guests to set up an atmosphere that makes it apparent that this is a time for celebration and new beginnings.

Photo by Gastev via Flickr

Plan the Brunch

With ideas for your venue in place, the next step is determining what you will serve. There are a few different options to choose from so consider the following options. Is your region famous for something out of the ordinary that is an unforgettable part of your city’s culture? Speak to the originators of this cuisine and entice them to join you in your altruistic efforts. Or, you can take the catering route and set up a menu with them so that the food is handled without any hassle. You can use ezcater.com to locate catering services nearby and read reviews from people who have used the service before. Finally, if you want to feature an eclectic mix, ask those who wish to participate in your community to bring a dish to pass, and coordinate a plan for how food will be served, and how you will make sure there is plenty to go around.

Photo by Sistak via Flickr

Advertise and Fundraise

Once you have the venue set and plan for what you will need to bring to this venue, advertise all around your community. Having a plan for what you will need will allow you to form a good ballpark estimate for your budget. Make clear that this is an opportunity for all members to share a special meal together for the occasion and that you need help getting things rolling. Bake sales are generally a huge hit, no matter your clientele, so check out whether your local community centers, churches and other organizations will allow you to fundraise in their space. Once you gain permission, sell your heart out and use this money to buy prizes for egg hunt winners, chocolates and candy for goodie bags, and decorations for your space. It is critical in this phase to make sure that you get your community excited about this event, so that they not only contribute financially, but show up when Easter comes.

Christmas and Thanksgiving are not the only time when people in need could use your support, so celebrate in style this Easter and get your community involved with each other.

Tim Esterdahl

Tim Esterdahl is the editor of IFCS blog. He is a married father of three and enjoys golf in his spare time.

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