Integrated Family Community Services 3370 South Irving Street, Englewood, CO 80110-1816 Ph: 303-789-0501

Family Fall: 3 Strategies To Help Your Kids Recover From A Car Accident

Car wrecks are difficult to process for adults. They are even more difficult, though, for children. If your child has been involved in a wreck, you may wonder about your next steps. Below are a few things to keep in mind when dealing with your child after such an incident.

Don’t Minimize The Trauma

Getting in a car accident is traumatic for everyone involved. If you were involved in the accident as well, you may be overly focused on your role in what happened. While this is understandable, it can also lead to children feeling like their role has been minimized. This in turn can lead to trauma going unrecognized and ultimately untreated. If you have been involved in a car wreck, make sure that you put a great deal of focus specifically on what your child has gone through. Don’t process the fallout for them—instead, help them to do so themselves.

Listen

Children are often in a difficult position after a wreck. They have very specific feelings and fears, but adults spend a great deal of time telling them how they should go forward. Instead of making yourself the expert on what your child is going through, listen to him or her. Recovery can be aided by adults who are willing to listen, even if the communication seems minor on its face. Remember, your child may not be fully aware of what is going on—but what he or she says might open the door for those revelations at a future date.

Get Legal Help

Finally, make sure you get the legal help you need to make sure your child can get help from other professionals. If you find yourself with legal questions, you should consider contacting a truck accident attorney. While it is likely that most already understand how having more money can provide for more services, few tend to realize the sense of closure it can give a child. Watching as his or her parents take the steps necessary to ensure that the accident is properly wrapped up can help a child to feel like his or her trauma is likewise being brought to a close. It’s not an end to the issues that accompany the wreck, but it can still be helpful.

Don’t ignore what your child has gone through after a car accident. Be willing to put aside your own issues, to listen, and to get the help you all need. The recovery process may be long, but it can be fruitful as long as you are willing to put in the effort.

Tim Esterdahl

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We want to recognize Cowboy Moving & Storage for their continued partnership in serving the community and providing needed boxes for the enormous amount food market orders. They personify the age old "Cowboy Creed" ...Live each day with courage...Do what needs to be done...Take pride in your work!.

They want to assist us in helping others "Cowboy/Cowgirl up". They will match dollar for dollar, any donations that are made to purchase moving boxes for the Market - this gives IFCS an equal amount of moving boxes that people make a donation to purchase - go to www.OneCanFeed.org and add a note to your donation that you want to "Cowboy/Cowgirl Up!"

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https://littletonindependent.net/stories/ifcs-food-bank-feeding-the-masses-despite-plunging-donations,299770

We are BLOWN AWAY by the quality of fresh fruit and fresh veggies we got from @FoodBankRockies today! Simply gorgeous. Call 303-789-0501 to get your box today.

Who remembers the IFCS Flood of 2017? Well, we had another pipe burst, but this time, staff was here to stop it from demolishing the building! We have some cleaning to do, but all food and goods are safe!

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