Integrated Family Community Services 3370 South Irving Street, Englewood, CO 80110-1816 Ph: 303-789-0501

Winter Winds: 4 Ways Your Family Can Get the Yard and Garden Ready for Fall

If you want your yards and garden to survive freezing temperatures and heavy storms, then you need to start winterizing them well before the first frost. Most trees, bushes, and flowers are extremely resilient, but you still don’t want to take any chances with your landscaping. These four tips will help you get your grass and plants ready for the harsh fall and winter months.

Remove Debris

While a thin coat of leaves will insulate your lawn and protect it from the elements, too much debris will prevent oxygen and water from getting to the roots. If you have a garden, then you should consider mulching all of your leaves, twigs, and branches. Mulch is extremely nutrient-dense, and it will help balance moisture levels during the wet season.

Aerate and Fertilize

Aerating allows water, oxygen, and fertilizer to reach the roots of your grass and plants. It should be done at least once or twice a year including just before the weather begins to cool off. Homeowners who have large lawns should consider renting a gas-powered or self-propelled aerator to speed this process up. Once you have aerated the soil, you then need to fertilize your yards to give your plants a boost of nutrients.

Inspect and Trim the Trees

Most trees and larger plants will become damaged if they aren’t properly trimmed every few months. Once the first snowstorm hits, the extra weight could snap weak branches and send them tumbling into your roof or walls. Some companies, like Smitty’s Tree Service, know that this is all too true. Trimming larger trees can be somewhat dangerous, and you might want to consider hiring a professional arborist or landscaping company if you don’t have the proper tools and equipment.

Start Planting Cool-Season Crops

Many different vegetables and bushes should be planted at the end of summer including broccoli, beets, carrots, and various berries. You can also plant germinated leafy green seeds that only take a few weeks to grow. If you plan on planting anything just before fall, you must make sure that you don’t get chemical fertilizers anywhere near the seeds, roots, or stems.

In addition to caring for all of your flora, you must also get your gardening equipment and outdoor furniture out of the elements. Items that are made out of wood or any other natural materials should be treated with a high-quality sealant. Anything that can’t be sealed such as plastic lawn furniture and rubber hoses must be stored inside a shed or garage to prevent permanent damage.

Tim Esterdahl

Find Us on Social Media

In case you missed it, check out our new video we debuted at our 2020 Nibbles and Sips event. Then, share, share, SHARE with your friends and colleagues. Through your support, we can make a BIG difference in lives of families in need. #onecanfeed

www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1T2yENbCWc&feature=youtu.be
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

The Jazz Hands Foundation band warming up the audience. Sounds good! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

IFCS On Twitter

In case you missed it, check out our new video we debuted at our 2020 Nibbles and Sips event. Then, share, share, SHARE with your friends and colleagues. Through your support, we can make a BIG difference in lives of families in need. #onecanfeed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1T2yENbCWc&feature=youtu.be

Getting ready for a great program at our 2020 Nibbles and Sips event! Are you here supporting your community? #onecanfeed

Please be advised, IFCS offices will be closed today, Monday, February 17, in observance of President's Day. We will re-open tomorrow, Tuesday, February 18 during normal business hours.

Load More...

Key Sponsors

Our Affliations

 

 

IFCS

Sign Up for our eNewsletter

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter
For Email Marketing you can trust

USDA Non-Discrimination Policy

IFCS follows the USDA non-discrimination policy. Learn more by clicking here to read the statement. (PDF)